The First Solar Eclipse Of The Year Is Coming This Month

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The first solar eclipse of 2021 would be seen in the skies on 10th June, and it would not only be your normal full eclipse, but it would also make the sun’s boundary circle appear as a ring of fire, putting up a fascinating show.

As per the latest by NASA, it would be visible from some parts of India, and curious early-rising individuals from Russia, Canada, and Greenland would be able to have a look at it. For all those lucky viewers who would witness the rare ring of fire in the sky, it is recommended that they wear sunglasses before chasing their love for a solar eclipse to keep their eyes from the possible harm.

The solar eclipse would also be seen from the big swaths of North America and Europe, while the ring of fire effect would be best visible from some parts of Canada and Siberia upon the moon blocking all of the sun just leaving its edges behind.

This naturally occurring phenomenon called annular solar eclipse is different from a total solar eclipse that covers the whole of the sun. NASA released an animation that provides an idea of how the eclipse would appear from different areas.

Annular solar eclipse 10 June

Another unique part of the solar eclipse that is soon to occur is that it would be visible at the time of sunrise at many places, making it that with a flat horizon to the east, the sun may appear as having horns as it rises instead of its everyday curved disc.

“Good places to see these phenomena are around Thunder Bay, Sault Ste Marie, Toronto, Philadelphia, New York City, and Atlantic City,” explains Michael Zeiler of GreatAmericanEclipse.com. “Other places will see the rising sun appear as a shark’s fin, such as Ottawa, Montreal, and Boston.”

For those who are situated at a place where it couldn’t be seen, don’t be afraid to miss it, as you have your chance to witness the live ring of fire on October 12, 2023, the only condition is to start packing your bag so that you can go to a place wherefrom it could be seen, once NASA predicts and digs deep down to find out.

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