China Is Launching A 36-Satellite Constellation – To Inspect Natural Disasters

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More advanced technology has allowed scientists and researchers to get more insight into space. This information will be used to help predict the incoming changes or events in the atmosphere. Space organizations are working on projects like this that help them make their systems more dependable and more predictable. Especially with climate change in progress now, the information needs to be accurate and precise for people to fully utilize the technology and make decisions accordingly.

China is one of the dominant countries that are leading this arena. Recently, the country has developed a project of building a constellation of 36 low-orbit satellites. These satellites will help the country to detect any onset of natural disasters and changes in the atmosphere. Besides that, they will provide information to make weather forecasting more accurate. The news was reported by China Daily.

The project is led by the Tianjin Satcom Geohe Technologies Co., Ltd. Guo Jianqiang. The president of the organization stated that the first satellite from the project will be launched in 2022 and the rest will be completed by 2023.

Looking at the industry, China is not the pioneer in this field. International Charter Space and Major Disasters is also working for the same cause. It uses satellite information to predict natural disasters and send rescue teams for help. It has 17 Charter members and 61 contributing satellites from around the world. The services continue 24/7 which means that every detail and every little disaster is monitored. They send help for every reported and detected accident.

Last April, China had also started working on another project of a 13,000-satellite internet mega constellation. This worked across a range of frequency bands. However, the issue arises where the question is if this constellation will add to the problem of space debris or not?

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