Redesigned Siemens Headquarters In Munich Now Consumes 90% Less Energy And 75% Less Water


Siemens-Headquarters-by-Henning-Larsen-Architects-10-1020x610
Picture Credits: inhabitat
Advertisement

Siemens’ headquarters in Munich have undergone an astonishing upgrade and have also got a DGNB Platinum and LEED Platinum certification for its energy efficiency and eco-green aspects. The company gave Henning Larsen Architects the mega project of re-structuring the courtyard building at Wittelsbacherplatz in Munich, Germany. The building saw a comprehensive sustainable strategy panned out and built around Siemens’ eco-friendly technology which includes solar panels and energy efficient lighting.

Picture Credits: inhabitat
Picture Credits: inhabitat

Salient features include green renovation, a larger courtyard, LEED Platinum certification standard modifications and an intelligent building design.

Picture Credits: inhabitat
Picture Credits: inhabitat

The building consists of a single volume, and has four rectangular courtyards. It also entails a publicly accessible ground floor providing a new connection between the areas of downtown Munich and the museum district. The installation of Floor-to-ceiling windows and a very satisfying and intelligent spatial organization allows the employees to have visual connection to their colleagues throughout the building.

Picture Credits: inhabitat
Picture Credits: inhabitat

There are various open areas as well which are meant to be meeting spaces for the people to be used for collaboration across departments.

Picture Credits: inhabitat
Picture Credits: inhabitat

And the icing on the cake, the holistic approach towards building a sustainable design means the new building sucks up 90% less electricity and 75% less water. This translates into a huge monetary profit for Siemens, and also makes the building incredibly Eco-friendly. The employees themselves can alter the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems of the building. And the smart building technology enables real-time data acquisition from 30,000 data points which allows a comprehensive insight into the daily energy performance of the building.

Picture Credits: inhabitat
Picture Credits: inhabitat

Have anything more to add to this article? Comment below!

 

Advertisement

What's Your Reaction?

Fail Fail
0
Fail
lol lol
0
lol
WTF WTF
0
WTF
Geeky Geeky
0
Geeky
Love Love
0
Love
WOW WOW
0
WOW

Comments 0

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

log in

reset password

Back to
log in