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This Is Why Planes Can’t Take Off In Extremely Hot Weather

The bad relation of a plane's takeoff and extreme heat conditions

Did you know planes get the same annoyed in extreme hot weather conditions as humans.

Hot weather conditions create technical issues with the plane’s takeoff. While most planes eventually get airborne in those conditions, it still could be fatal if luck is not in favor.

The atmospheric pressure at higher altitudes is low, which hinders the engine’s and the wings functioning. However, not to the extent that it falls to be a concern. But it is a whole lot different story if we talk about takeoff.

The same conditions are created when the weather is at extreme highs. The air gets thinner, leaving the wings with lesser molecules to collide with, resulting in hard takeoff.

An aircraft’s wings don’t get enough of the atmospheric pressure to create the lift in hot weather conditions, hence lacking the flow of gas required to takeoff. To understand better, the wings aid in changing the flow and velocity by forcing air downwards to go airborne. In hot weather conditions, aircraft don’t get that and require longer runways to gain more speed when lacking the air particles in abundance.

A low level of oxygen in extreme heat conditions also hinders the engine’s capacity to create power. Fewer oxygen results in less combustion, having a direct impact on engines’ power generating capacity. Both these effects combined worsen the situation and could lead to takeoff accidents as happened in the past.

Air pressure is a key ingredient to a plane’s takeoff and flight, as it lets the wings create underneath pressure to create and maintain the lift.

Taking off in hot weather is a risk; however, it is not impossible to do so. It asks for a longer runway so to reach the desired takeoff speed. Although, history has examples where the aircrafts crashed right after slightly taking off, due to less pressure underneath the wings and bad combustion in hot weather conditions like in Phoenix.

Researchers and scientists are building electric and hydrogen run aircraft, and more of those would be needed with rapid growing temperatures. It gets too difficult to take off for combustion engines in hot weather conditions, whereas electric run planes sound a promising fit in this regard.