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SpaceX’s Spacecraft Causes Sonic Boom During Return To The Surface In Florida – Alarms Citizens

SpaceX's Spacecraft Caused A Sonic Boom In Florida After Coming Back To Earth

On Thursday (September 30th), residents of Jacksonville, Florida, reported a tremendous ‘boom.’ The sound, it turns out, could have been the SpaceX Dragon capsule returning to Earth.

Residents reported hearing a thunderous sound that “shook their house” and “sounded like someone jumped on their roof,” according to Insider. It was the kind of distress that, as space travel becomes more affordable, could become the norm.

The effect is a sound that corresponds to shock waves and is produced when an object travels faster than the speed of sound through the air.

SpaceX’s Dragon 2 spacecraft broke the sound barrier seconds before splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean. The fiery capsule was seen scorching into the atmosphere in social media videos.

The revelation was initially reported by Action News Jax, a Florida-based media outlet. People across the city, notably at St Augustine and Orange Park, reported hearing a thunderous noise.

SpaceX’s 23rd commercial supply mission, known as CRS-23, launched aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, has successfully completed. It resupplied the mission to the International Space Station on September 30th without any hitch. The spacecraft lasted in orbit for about a month after delivering supplies, scientific research equipment, and technology demonstrations.

It delivered about 4,600 pounds of cargo, according to NASA, including frozen experiment specimens used to investigate diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and type 2 diabetes.

In addition, it also transported samples from a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency study into unique biomaterials responsible for preventing muscle atrophy in microgravity.

With the increasing number of space launches, there’s a substantial scope that more people will be able to see and perhaps hear the return of a spacecraft.